Gastric Bypass Surgery Requirements

Gastric Bypass surgery is also known as Bariatric Surgery or weight-loss surgery. It is a surgical procedure that helps you lose weight by changing how your stomach and small intestine handle the food you eat.
Taanya
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Aug 28, 2018 9:14 pm

Gastric Bypass Surgery Requirements

Unread post by Taanya » Tue Aug 28, 2018 11:03 pm

Gastric bypass surgery is the most common type of weight-loss surgery. Gastric bypass and other types of weight-loss surgery, collectively known as bariatric surgery, make surgical changes to your stomach and digestive system that limit how much food you can eat and how many nutrients you absorb, leading to weight loss.

Guidelines to qualify for gastric bypass surgery
Gastric bypass and other weight-loss surgeries are major, life-changing procedures. While weight-loss surgery can help reduce your risk of weight-related health problems — such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and sleep apnea — it can also pose major risks and complications. You may need to meet certain medical guidelines to qualify for weight-loss surgery. You likely will have an extensive screening process to see if you qualify.

In general, gastric bypass or another weight-loss surgery could be an option for you if:
  • Efforts to lose weight with diet and exercise have been unsuccessful
  • Your body mass index (BMI) is 40 or higher
  • Your BMI is 35 or more and you have a serious weight-related health problem, such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure or severe sleep apnea
  • You're a teenager who's gone through puberty, your BMI is 35 or more, and you have serious obesity-related health problems, such as type 2 diabetes or severe sleep apnea
  • In some cases, you may qualify for certain types of weight-loss surgery if your BMI is 30 to 34 and you have serious weight-related health problems.
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Sophia
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Nov 17, 2018 11:10 am

Re: Gastric Bypass Surgery Requirements

Unread post by Sophia » Tue Nov 20, 2018 3:24 pm

Hi, I had my surgery 9/11/18. I was unable to drink very much because everything felt like it was not digesting, sitting in my chest and throat. Had to go to emergency room. Had same problem going home, pick line inserted for TON, 2 days later infection and almost died. Blood pressure 67/28. Sent by ambulance to ER for more dehydration. I am now drinking and eating soft foods, but I get really jittery, shaky and lightheaded. I don't know what to do, I feel awful and no energy all the time. Please help.

Stephanie
Posts: 15
Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2019 2:50 pm

Re: Gastric Bypass Surgery Requirements

Unread post by Stephanie » Tue Feb 05, 2019 3:59 pm

Gastric bypass surgery: Who is it for?

Gastric bypass surgery is the most common type of weight-loss surgery. Gastric bypass and other types of weight-loss surgery, collectively known as bariatric surgery, make surgical changes to your stomach and digestive system that limit how much food you can eat and how many nutrients you absorb, leading to weight loss.

While that may sound appealing, gastric bypass surgery isn't for everyone. Like any major procedure, it has significant health risks and side effects. In addition, the long-term success of gastric bypass surgery depends on your ability to make permanent changes in your lifestyle. When you want to be considered for gastric bypass surgery, you must undergo a thorough evaluation to determine if it's suitable for your situation.

Guidelines to qualify for gastric bypass surgery
Gastric bypass and other weight-loss surgeries are major, life-changing procedures. While weight-loss surgery can help reduce your risk of weight-related health problems — such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and sleep apnea — it can also pose major risks and complications. You may need to meet certain medical guidelines to qualify for weight-loss surgery. You likely will have an extensive screening process to see if you qualify.

In general, gastric bypass or another weight-loss surgery could be an option for you if:
  • Efforts to lose weight with diet and exercise have been unsuccessful
  • Your body mass index (BMI) is 40 or higher
  • Your BMI is 35 or more and you have a serious weight-related health problem, such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure or severe sleep apnea
  • You're a teenager who's gone through puberty, your BMI is 35 or more, and you have serious obesity-related health problems, such as type 2 diabetes or severe sleep apnea
In some cases, you may qualify for certain types of weight-loss surgery if your BMI is 30 to 34 and you have serious weight-related health problems.

Evaluating if you're ready for gastric bypass surgery

Even if you meet these general guidelines, you still may need to meet certain other medical guidelines to qualify for weight-loss surgery. You likely will have an extensive screening process to see if you qualify.

A team of health professionals — usually including a doctor, dietitian, psychologist and surgeon — evaluate whether gastric bypass or one of the other forms of weight-loss surgery is appropriate for you. This evaluation generally determines if the health benefits of the surgery outweigh the potentially serious risks, and if you're medically ready to undergo the procedure.

The evaluation also determines if you're psychologically ready to undergo weight-loss surgery. The procedure may increase certain risks in people with existing mental health conditions that aren't effectively managed.

For example, recent studies have identified an increased risk of suicide in people who have had weight-loss surgery. This risk is greatest in those who have attempted suicide in the past. More research is needed to understand whether changes related to the surgery itself play a role in increasing suicide risk.

A history of suicidal thoughts or attempts does not necessarily mean bariatric surgery isn't right for you, but your health care team should carefully evaluate your history and plan for close monitoring and support before and after the surgery.

When conducting an evaluation for gastric bypass surgery, the health care team considers:
  • Your nutrition and weight history. The team reviews your weight trends, diet attempts, eating habits, exercise regimen, stress level, time constraints, motivation and other factors.
  • Your medical condition. Some health problems increase the risks associated with having surgery or may be worsened by surgery, such as blood clots, liver disease, heart problems, kidney stones and nutritional deficiencies. The team evaluates what medications you take, how much alcohol you drink and whether you smoke. You will be evaluated for sleep apnea and receive a thorough physical exam and laboratory testing. The results of these tests and exams may help determine eligibility for weight-loss surgery.
  • Your psychological status. Certain mental health conditions may contribute to obesity or make it more difficult for you to maintain the health benefits of gastric bypass surgery. These may include binge-eating disorder, substance abuse, anxiety disorders, major depression, schizophrenia, severe bipolar disorder and issues related to childhood sexual abuse.
While these conditions may not prevent you from having gastric bypass surgery, your doctors may want to postpone surgery to ensure that any condition or significant sources of stress are appropriately treated and managed.
  • Your motivation. The team will also assess your willingness and ability to follow through with recommendations made by your health care team and to carry out prescribed changes in your diet and exercise routine.
  • Your age.
There's no specific age limit for gastric bypass surgery, but, until recently, the procedure was considered too risky for teenagers and older adults. Newer studies have found gastric bypass surgery can be safe and effective for adults ages 60 and older. The procedure is also now considered an option for some teenagers with a BMI of 35 or more and serious obesity-related health problems.

Charlotte
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2019 4:10 pm

!!! Dangerous Weight Loss Methods !!!

Unread post by Charlotte » Thu Feb 14, 2019 10:48 am

What would you give up to be skinny? How about your health? Well, some of the methods of weight loss may cost you exactly that. Before you decide that the way to lose weight is to follow one of the below regimens, take a second look. Do your research and be sure that you understand the risks.

We’re all looking for that magic pill. You know - the one that we can take and lose weight without really trying!What would you give up to be skinny? How about your health? Well, some of the methods of weight loss may cost you exactly that. Before you decide that the way to lose weight is to follow one of the below regimens, take a second look. Do your research and be sure that you understand the risks.
Are you considering one of these dangerous weight loss methods?*Prescription diet pillsAmphetamines are available only by prescription, and most doctors are leery of handing them out these days. While they do suppress appetite, you learn nothing about healthy eating, you don’t change your eating habits, and you are likely to gain the weight back the moment you stop taking them. In addition, they can be habit forming. The side effects include high blood pressure, heart arrhythmia, sleeplessness, hallucinations and delusions.


- Ephedra This all natural Asian herb is found in many herbal remedies and weight loss powders. It has a powerful appetite suppressant effect, but has been implicated in over 70 deaths.

- Phentermine Fenfluramine-phentermine (fen-phen)Fen-phen was a popular weight loss supplement in the 90’s until it was implicated in deaths due to heart-valve damage. Phentermine alone is still sold in many weight loss aids. The side effects include headaches, dizziness, heart arrhythmia, high blood pressure and insomnia.

- Laxatives One of the popular home remedies, used for purging. Regular use and abuse of laxatives can result in low potassium, arrhythmia, and pancreatic damage.

- Artificial Sweeteners Aspartame, the most commonly used artificial sweetener, has been implicated in multiple lawsuits alleging damages that include blindness, seizures and brain damage.

- Smoking Afraid you’ll gain weight if you quit smoking? The National Institute of Diabetes says that you’d have to gain 100-150 pounds to match the health risks you invoke by smoking. Instead, set up healthy strategies to help you deal with food cravings and put down the cigarettes.

- Purging Like laxatives, purging by forcing oneself to vomit or taking emetics can have very damaging effects on health. Depletion of nutrients like potassium and vitamins, damage to the esophagus from stomach acids, and esophageal rupture are all possible side effects.

- Diuretics ,Taking diuretics encourages your body to rid itself of fluids - including vital electrolytes. The depletion can lead to dehydration, and cause your body to start retaining water, starting a vicious cycle. Repeated or prolonged use of diuretics can lead to kidney damage and serious electrolyte imbalances, which may result in kidney or heart failure.

- Herbal Remedies We have a tendency to equate ‘herbal’ with ‘harmless’, but say nutritionists, this isn’t always the case. Remember that many medications are derived from herbs, and because of the lack of regulation, dosages of active ingredients can vary widely from one manufacturer to another. Below is a list of some of the most common ingredients found in herbal weight loss powders, along with cautions about their effects in certain conditions.

Ephedra (ma huang, ephedrine, ephedra extract, epitonin, ephdra sinica and sida cordifolia) should not be taken by people with heart, thyroid or kidney disease, or with hypertensionCascara and Senna should not be taken by people taking diuretics (both are often found in herbal weight loss teas)Selenium and Capsaicin should not be taken by people with bowel or digestive disordersKava should be avoided by people with mood disorders who are taking mood altering medication, and people with Parkinson’s disease.
Gingko biloba, licorice root, and dong quay should not be taken by people who are taking blood thinners or anti-coagulants.
While weight loss is a worthwhile goalFree Web Content, guarding your health is an even more important one. Be sure that whatever weight loss method you choose it won’t lead to other serious medical conditions.

Victoria
Posts: 12
Joined: Sat Feb 16, 2019 2:49 pm

Re: Gastric Bypass Surgery Requirements

Unread post by Victoria » Wed Feb 20, 2019 12:52 pm

I had a doctor that pushed Phentermine on me several years ago as a way to lose some weight. I lost 3 pounds the first week but started experiencing side effects like intestinal, and I developed a typical allergic reaction to Phentermine- my skin got itchy all over.. I stopped taking it.
She never bothered to tell me either, that once you stop taking it, the weight will come back.
I think Phentermine should be banned. Its just an amphedemine

Aria
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed Feb 20, 2019 2:29 pm

Re: Gastric Bypass Surgery Requirements

Unread post by Aria » Wed Feb 27, 2019 3:26 pm

Great article! Really informative, thanks :)

Penelope
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Feb 28, 2019 11:12 am

Re: Gastric Bypass Surgery Requirements

Unread post by Penelope » Wed Mar 06, 2019 12:43 pm

Victoria wrote:
Wed Feb 20, 2019 12:52 pm
I had a doctor that pushed Phentermine on me several years ago as a way to lose some weight. I lost 3 pounds the first week but started experiencing side effects like intestinal, and I developed a typical allergic reaction to Phentermine- my skin got itchy all over.. I stopped taking it.
She never bothered to tell me either, that once you stop taking it, the weight will come back.
I think Phentermine should be banned. Its just an amphedemine
The weight returned back, because you probably forgot to change your eating habits.

Evelyn
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2019 2:18 pm

Re: Gastric Bypass Surgery Requirements

Unread post by Evelyn » Tue Mar 12, 2019 12:57 pm

Doctors are licence to "practice" medicine. Practice is the operative word here. To lose weight effectively involves eating sensibly and exercising. doctors, offer "try this" methods. the pills some prescribe are not wonder drugs or magic pills. But more like "let's see if this will work for you."

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